How much do Online Tutors earn?

As I have been getting quite a kick out of answering these questions I find online, I would like to attempt to shed some light on this area. This answer, like so many others pondering a monetary value assigned to a skill, is largely dependent on a number of factors:

  • Your Credentials
  • Your Tutoring Medium
  • Your Subject Area
  • Your Demand

Let’s look at each in just a little detail so as not to make a monster wall of text but still provide some meat to dig into. (I personally tutor math, so the example numbers I use will be based on that information.)

Your Credentials

As with any job, the more capable you are, the more people are willing to pay you. As a general rule of thumb, high school students charge $15–20 per hour, college students charge up to $30, individuals with a bachelor’s degree move up to $40, and master’s degrees go to $50+ per session.

Typically, this would vary slightly due to geographic location. Large, more affluent cities will be willing to pay higher rates on average than smaller towns. Conversely, areas with less tutors in your specialty may let you set your own rates. Buuuut, the online world doesn’t care about any of that.

In my mid-sized city with one of the lowest costs of living in the United States, families couldn’t care less that some New York tutors charge up to $150/hr because they are paying $40/hr for excellent teachers. My advice, figure out what your specialty averages overall, and charge that.

Your Tutoring Medium

This could honestly be the largest deciding factor in this list. What I mean by medium is how you choose to go about offering your services. Should you choose a tutoring service such as Wyzant to simply list yourself as an in-person tutor, the values would be very similar to what I stated above.

Other sites such as tutor .com pay out somewhere in the $10-$15 range as they take their cut and have to make money as a business. The most profitable, however, are those who have their own websites and promote themselves there. Taking into account the other factors on this list, you could earn quite a good living.

Taking things a step further, you could also offer lessons coaching other tutors or hopefuls dreaming of making a fortune charging upwards of $500 for a specific online course package where you meet with clients.

Your Subject Area

Again, I personally make my supplemental income through tutoring math. The numbers I have been quoting through personal experience. Few academic subjects other than physics or specialty courses will earn you more. That said, there is oh so much more you could do other than simple academic tutoring.

I mentioned above that some internet gurus offer training to emulate their success. Perhaps you’ve heard of copywriting and it’s potential to earn you tens of thousands of dollars for a few hours of work. It isn’t a scam. It is completely possible, assuming of course you are very very well known with outstanding results. But those who are well known are happy to train you for your shot…for a high price.

Add to this skills such as playing a musical instrument or sports coaching one-on-one and you can see just how diversified tutoring can be.

Your Demand

Just how good are you? What can you offer that no one else can? You should be readily able to answer these questions in order to land clients. Perhaps you are just as good as the next mathematician but offer quick wit an humor. That can be your catch for students. Maybe you are an excellent storyteller or have a knack for empathizing to help alleviate stress before tests.

Whatever makes you you is your highest selling point because there isn’t anyone else that can do it the same. Granted, you do need to be skilled at your specialty in order to teach others. Figuring out the demand for your skill as well as your specific ability to teach it will help you determine what you are worth usually through experimenting with different prices.

Conclusion

No answer will be a one-size-fits-all here which is hopefully apparent just with the four extremely broad and over-simplified factors that I mentioned here. In the end, it is up to you to set your prices and come to a justifiable amount for your own services.

What I aim to provide through blogging about this topic is a guide to getting started on your own. Even though every case is unique, researching the successes others have seen can help you to discover your own path to achieving similar goals.

Thanks everyone!

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Breaking Into the Tutoring Game

The following is an answer that I wrote for a question on Quora that I will link to here:

How much does an average mathematics tutor earn monthly?

The answer is of course that it really depends. I am sure that isn’t the response you were looking for, however, so I will do my best to toss in my two cents.

First I am going to assume that you mean tutoring privately as yourself and not through a business such as Mathnasium or Sylvan, both of which I have been employed by and even run at some points. At either you can earn anywhere from $9/hr to $20/hr for private lessons. The advantage to such employment is guaranteed income at 5 to 20 hours per week with the possibility of more as you devote more time to them and rise in ranks.

The next factor to consider is what you are charging. This will rely on both your qualifications and location. I live in a mid-sized city where math tutors charge from $15/hr as high school students to $50/hr as teachers with masters degree or higher. I personally charge $20 to $30 for each hour.

Finally, you must take into account the time you are willing to invest in tutoring. As a teacher, much of my day is naturally devoted to my job in addition to planning lessons and grading. Thus, I typically only have from four in the afternoon until whenever I feel like is a good time to stop. A word of caution here, however. It is very easy to get burned out working late into the evening and pulling consistent 13 or 14 hour days, so if this is a part-time endeavor on the side, mind your health.

On average, I once read somewhere that tutors can make an extra $500 a month as a simple side gig. Personally, I average around $2000 tutoring with some months as low as $600 and others as high as $2800. (My all time record was a month where I brought in almost $7000.) I have been told that I am a more rare case, to be fair.

If your purpose in asking this is to begin supplementing your own income through tutoring, I have a few suggestions.

  1. Start Now — I managed to make a name for myself in college by having my name on their tutor list to be provided to local parents who inquired about help for their children. The ultimate key to building up a steady stream of students is through recommendations made over time. I know everyone hates to hear that nothing is a “get rich quick scheme,” but I can attest that anything worth doing takes time. As you work with more and more students, you will slowly gain a following.
  2. Get a Facebook Page — This one is actually unique from what many professionals would suggest purely because I mean to have the page as your primary source of contact. I purchased a website and maintained it for two years with zero response even from the fairly decent number of pupils I had already. My Facebook page, however, continues to bring new customers. Perhaps others have had different experiences, but this is what worked for me. (And it is completely free! I wouldn’t even recommend running their ads!)
  3. Make Every Session Your Best — Ultimately, your best qualification and source of new clients will be word of mouth. This is especially true for any city with a population of less than 100,000. Be your own unique self. Personally, I live by the philosophy that math terrifies people, so I make them laugh and boost their confidence. I promise that if you can get a student to laugh even once, their mindset will change, and their parents will notice. Associating any academic venue with happiness instead of pain for a family that has been having struggles is sure to have them talking about you to their friends.
  4. Figure Out Where to Advertise — Alas, even though this is surprisingly the least important part of the puzzle, it is just as necessary. Where else are you going to find your first student to start making your recommendations? I have found success in Craigslist, Facebook (as mentioned above), college campuses, and math departments. Anywhere that will let you post a flyer will help get your name out. Talk to others in your area to see the most visited spots both online as well as in physical locations. The most useful areas are those where you would find your prospective clientele. You’d be surprised how helpful people can be with a simple conversation about what you are wanting to do.

These are only four of dozens of tips floating around in my head as well as making rounds on the web, but they are broad enough to help get you started. Everyone’s experience is unique, so as you begin to get a feel for how you would like to work you will undoubtedly find your own successful route. What helped me was my experience at Mathnasium and Sylvan honing my ability to break topics down all the way from pre-K through Calculus. This lead to building relationships with parents who sought me out after a center closed and they still desired math help.

Some of those parents recommended me to a private school where I found my dream job and continued to make more contacts. And the success snowballs from there as long as you remain honest and love what you do. That is where the time part comes into the equation.

At the end of the day, the best advice is to begin tutoring because you want to make a difference in students’ lives. This passion will drive you to become better which will draw the attention of the clients you need. I wish you the best and hope that I didn’t drone on too long as well as managed to answer your question adequately. Good luck!

Kagan Love

Why Buy a Book

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The internet is a remarkable place in that it provides the greatest resource of knowledge ever to exist. The sheer amount of information readily available at my fingertips never ceases to amaze me. This is partially due to the equally simple process of adding to that wealth of data via forums, blogs, and, you guessed it, ebooks. It has certainly never been easier to write and publish your book with absolutely no cost for the world to view. Whether good or bad (certainly a debate for another time), I believe it is safe to say no one would argue that almost every nook and cranny has been explored through the written word.

As a result, we authors, both seasoned and new, understand from the beginning that from the moment we submit our work to a traditional publisher or hit publish on a digital retailer such as Amazon, it becomes one drop in a sea of titles for readers to peruse. Success, particularly in terms of sales, requires a special combination of marketing, networking, and research. But something is missing, isn’t it? Oh yeah, a good, quality book.

I don’t know about the rest of you, but I did my research and felt wonderfully overwhelmed by all the different ideas as to how to successfully break into the ebook world and get my work  noticed. It wasn’t until I took a step back to breathe that I remembered my initial purpose: to entertain others with the story I loved inside my own head. I believe it is easy to forget that the most important component of gaining readers is the quality of the book we produce. (This is despite the incessant reminders on every blog I read such as this, and this, and this, and this…)

Though “a good book” was mentioned in every example above either in terms of putting forth your best work or planning exactly how to enter your niche, I still let all the little nuances of how to sell my book consume me. Amidst this whirlwind of brainstorming it dawned on me that I was doing this for myself and anyone who would enjoy my story. With this purpose in mind, I made up my mind to remind myself daily of my true goals, which brings me to the purpose of this article (longest intro ever, right?).

In a medium saturated with articles from writers coaching others how to emulate their success, I chose to instead write about how to approach your ebook from another angle. Here, I would like to remind you how to critique your odds of success from a perspective that we are all experts in: the eyes of a reader.

Why would I buy this?

The same question posed in the title of this article, but now it is yours. I’m sure everyone who reads this has asked themselves exactly the same question in some form or another when deciding if a prospective title is worth their time, energy, and emotion. Each of us has a myriad of ways to answer, but I would like to attempt to narrow it down into three overly broad categories.

  • I can relate to the characters or story setting.
  • I am a fan of this type of story.
  • I am left needing to know more about this story.

I Can Relate

What I’m referring to here might not be exactly what first comes to mind as you read this heading. Though an initial reaction of “OMG! I totally know exactly what he/she is dealing with!” certainly sells your title, those of us with a young inventor as the main protagonist who is attempting to stop an inter-species war while dealing with his own newly discovered ability to shapeshift typically aren’t so lucky.

No, what I am talking about is after only a few pages you have bonded with one or several characters due to some individual characteristic that you either see or would like to see in yourself. Example: For me while reading Harry Potter for the first time (I know you’ll all get sick of me referring to my favorite read, but it shaped my life, ok!), I couldn’t say I was orphaned or that I was mentally abused in my home life and looking for some escape. What I latched onto was school was a home for Harry just as it was for me. His morals and willpower in the face of peril were the aspects that I wanted to emulate.

In my own book, Shifter, I don’t expect for people to relate to Alex in his situation or even home life. Instead I hope they find his ideals noteworthy or his view of the world in that it needs something new. I want for them to find that they were more amazing in themselves all along than they ever realized, not due to some newfound ability but because they find their own self-worth. Just that one single piece of a story where a reader can see his or her self is enough for them to find they’ve entered the world you’ve written in the place of the protagonist.

I Love Stuff Like This

This section is important for two reasons, the first of which we will quickly gloss over. Amazon clumps together titles to try to sell buyers more stuff they might like, so if you haven’t already utilized those keywords to put your work in a category where it belongs and can compete well, get on it! More importantly, readers are drawn to stories with plots, settings, and character types that they are familiar with and enjoyed in other books. Take the post-apocalyptic setting, for example. Numerous titles that became movies over the past few years took advantage of this hype and were extremely successful in more ways than one.

If your idea is to enter the world of zombies, do it right! You most likely adore zombies yourself and have read and watched hundreds of titles featuring the brain-hungry creatures. Just be sure that you are clear in your description as well as any preview that you provide for your book so that readers can immediately recognize “oh, this is just like ___! I loved ___!” As I love Harry Potter and Artemis Fowl due to my addiction to teen fiction, I wanted it to be very clear that the protagonist was a teen and the tone would entertain readers who enjoyed the same works I always have.

As a bonus, this means you will already have something in common with all of your readers which helps you with blogging and any kind of interaction to have a talking point. Like I said in Aspiring to Aspiring Writer, I believe first and foremost that writing is all about loving people and interacting with them. Hence, this is one of my favorite reasons to have put my own title out for the world to read.

Can’t…Stop…Reading

Here is where previews or free books really get to shine. Having a great hook in your description or even the first few pages that Amazon likes to offer will work just as well, however, if you are willing to put in the work and really grab the attention of prospective readers. In my mind, the greatest compliment someone could offer me would be to say “I finished your book because I just couldn’t put it down!” This shows me that my writing, my characters, and my world are so compelling that a reader can’t get enough and is left craving more.

It is here that every successful title shines and draws people back for more and more in series or even just to get more of an author’s mind. If you have a specific scene or moment in your own work that you yourself repeatedly return to just to enjoy again, then this might be a sign that you’ve done a great job. Remembering what I said above about attracting like-minded readers, those same pages are certain to capture a reader’s attention and have them begging for more!

So, Why Buy?

Because I simply have to have this book! Because I enjoyed the work and want to support the author entirely for the selfish reason that I need to be fed more from their mind! Because the characters are so amazing that I want to know every aspect of their lives before and after the story ends! Because this world can go on and on, and I must know all the untold stories hiding within! Because this book is worth my investment!

As always, I hope this encourages you to either finish your masterpiece or to share your work where I can read it. There are so many untold stories out there just waiting for me to dive in and enjoy while finding new inspiration from amazing writers. Don’t lose yourself to the marketing side of things. Instead, stay true to your reasons for writing and try to approach your work as the fan you already are.

Common Core Addition

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As a private math tutor, I am called upon for a number of reasons.  Some parents contact me out of concern that their child is falling behind.  Others reach out to me in the hopes that I can help get their kid to the top of their class or achieve the scores they need to get accepted to the prestigious school of their choice.  Lately, however, I have been approached to simply help students with their homework.  It is not necessarily that the student is behind or looking to expand their knowledge and jump ahead.  Instead, the parents see the methods being used and come to me in frustration to answer the questions that their children have.

While it is true that this is good for business, and it is nice to make a living doing what I love helping people better understand math…I would feel too guilty charging for something that I can remedy in less than an hour.  That is why I am hoping to simplify some of the “crazy stuff” that kids are bringing home these days so that parents aren’t left scratching their heads wondering what is is that a teacher is looking for.

First of all, let’s start with the basics.  If you have a kid who’s in Kindergarten through Second Grade, they are most likely working on adding and subtracting numbers to begin with.  Now many reading this might scoff and say, “Addition? Subtraction?  Why can’t they figure this stuff out?”  Well, let me show you a few things.

Let’s look at an example of a fairly basic problem:

I would hope that this looks simple to the majority of us.  Now consider this, how do you know that 4 added to 8 results in 12.  In the beginning we were given pictures; one group of 8 somethings then a group of 4 somethings and told to count them all up.  Of course, we would count 12 somethings in total.  The problem with this is that counting is slow and we would like to eventually move into memorizing this as a basic addition fact.  How then can we help a young student to internalize this idea that 8 plus 4 equals 12?

This is where some of the Common Core strategies come into play.  Now, let me just preface this with a disclaimer.  I like the methods for helping students to learn concepts that are having trouble with more “old-school” techniques, but these are not useful for everyone.  I believe I made my stance clear on the matter in my other post here (Common Core Rant).  We good?  Ok, back to delving into some of these things.

If a child is having trouble quickly remembering that 8 and 4 make 12, then we have to come up with another way to come up with the answer that is more efficient than drawing objects and counting.  The first step would be to recognize which number is larger.  In this case, 8 is bigger than 4, so we would begin with 8 and count up by 4: 9, 10, 11, 12.  So 12 is our answer.  This is still slow, but it is slightly quicker than counting up to 12 with two groups.  The reason this step is important is for problems like this:

Though this is the same problem, initially, students don’t realize this.  Showing young children that a group of 4 and a group of 8 is the same thing as a group of 8 and a group of 4 is another building block that helps with fact families and more difficult problems later on.  For a student to realize that he or she can start with the larger number will also save time as counting up 8 from 4 will take longer than counting up 4 from 8.  This idea of addition being Commutative is a concept that we get to show students even though they may already have memorized 8+4=12, which is one reason that a teacher may spend extra time on some of these facts.

After establishing that we can count on from the bigger number, we can extend this further.  Knowing something called Ten Facts, we can help students to break problems down into easier pieces.  For instance, we know:

Since we are adding 4, we need to add two more to get to our answer 12.  Ok, there is a lot going on here.  Our number system is based on tens, so being able to recognize how to get to ten, and later to multiples of ten, can help improve students’ efficiency later on in life.  So recognizing all the tens facts,

will help with knowing how to make it to ten for the first step in addition problems involving answers over ten.  Again, notice that both 8+2 and 2+8 are listed as facts.  This is a chance to reinforce the idea that addition can be performed in any order so that with extra practice, students are more likely to internalize the concept.  The second important skill necessary here is to know that 2+2=4.  With the tens facts, a child can see how to get from the larger number up to ten, but that won’t do any good if he or she doesn’t know how much left to add.

Being able to decompose numbers into parts or groups is not only a way for children to perform the rest of this problem and others like it, it also helps to lead into subtraction later on.  Knowing doubles like 2+2=4, or being able to see facts like 1+3, 2+2, and 0+4 all equal 4 will help a student to figure out how much more must be added after figuring out the distance from 8 to ten.  All these methods are explained in school, and the student decides which is easiest or which he or she remembers the quickest to know that 2 more must still be added.

This brings us to the final step of adding 2 to 10.  Being able to add single-digit numbers to ten is useful because it is one of the more quickly learned skills (which builds confidence in students who are struggling) and can carry forward to adding to multiples of ten like 20, 30, 40, and so on.  One of my favorite ways to show students how to add numbers is to say them close together.  For example with 3 and ten, if you say them quickly, you get “threeten,” which sounds a lot like thirteen.  The same with “fourten” and others.  With 11 and 12, the sound doesn’t play out so well, but after practicing the others, the student usually pics up the pattern (and finding a pattern is the best we can hope for our students as a teacher).  Whatever the path, the student will find a way to finish up to see that 10 +2 =12.  So let’s review:

hmmm… I know:

and

so if I added 2 to 8 already, I need to add 2 more:

Phew, that’s a lot of steps, but look at all the good things we learned to get there.  In the end, memorization is the goal.  However, simply memorizing isn’t always the best.  As I stated in Common Core Rant, students who have a deeper understanding of more basic concepts are better prepared to extend that knowledge when working on more difficult problems later on.  Yes, this takes more work, but it could be the only way that your child is capable of getting to the answer if he or she just isn’t remembering the fact initially.

Ultimately, if you prefer that your child learns in a different way, that’s what tutors such as myself are around for, to supplement the education that they are receiving.  However, my goal here is to show the method to the madness and help explain away some of the confusion that many parents have come to me with.  Hopefully, next time your young student comes home with this “crazy new math,” you’ll have an idea of what is going on and what the teacher is trying to convey through these longer processes.  Again, not every student learns the same way, which is my problem with Common Core, since teachers are required to teach the entire class the same methods even though it may not be the most effective.  The techniques are useful, however, and we should appreciate the thought that has gone into helping all children better understand math.

I will continue on with some of the subtraction techniques in my next post, and from there I will go on to cover multiplication and division.  Thanks for reading, and be sure to like or subscribe as this will most likely become a series I am writing!

Aspiring to Aspiring Writer

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My entire life has been devoted to simply getting by. Only in the past few years have I even attempted to settle down and focus on myself. Amidst all this recent self-discovery, I have found just how badly I want to write for a living. As I’ve stated numerous times, I have always loved the written word. So it wasn’t much of a revelation to me that an area that I needed to foster in my life was to simply write more.

What did come as a shock, however, was the depth of this desire to write and become an author. Thus, for my first true blog post, I will not write about “How to Become an Author” or “7 Tips for Writing a Bestseller” or even “How I Made Writing a Career.” No, instead, I will take you through my journey from the beginning as I am still aspiring to reach the point in my life where I can call myself an aspiring writer.

Here I will explain the major characteristics that I feel define a writer that you can identify in yourself to see if pursing the profession seems as alluring as it still does for me.

That Story Won’t Go Away

First and foremost, you probably have that idea in your head that you just can’t shake. Perhaps it is some amazing story that you were inspired to conjure up through some major happening in your life. Possibly you simply enjoy writing, and the culmination of all of your experience has brought forth a masterpiece in your mind. Or maybe you are simply like me with a recurring daydream that somehow pieced itself together into an irresistible urge to be recorded for others.

Regardless, you now cannot get this immense story off your mind and think it’d be awesome to share with the world in the off chance they might enjoy it, too. I believe this is one of the most deciding characteristics that people such as myself find to push them forward in their pursuit of becoming an author. Money is nice, as are any rewards for our work, but in the end it is the desire to fulfill our artistic sides that drive us forward to immortalize our thoughts on paper. Having such a tale ready to burst forth is definitely a good sign that you are researching the right career.

So if you are reading this thinking “Hey! He’s talking about                         !” then chances are that you may just yet realize your dreams. (And I might get to read that little nagging story inside your head.)

You Like to Read

While this might seem like a no-brainer, I still feel it is worth mentioning. I don’t know of any writer I know, have read about, or whose work I’ve read, that does not admit to being an avid reader. After all, such amazing works as Artemis Fowl and Harry Potter had to draw inspiration from some source. Their respective authors drew on a combination of life experiences and stories they themselves were fans of to cultivate their own imaginations to birth amazing tales that have become staples for the industry.

Speaking solely for myself, Harry Potter was my childhood. Growing up I was completely enamored of the wizarding world. With age I began to respect the multitude of unique characters and each of their developments throughout the story. Now I love to get lost in the universe that is witches and wizards to imagine the untold tales that surely happened behind the scenes. This passion and love for such an amazing book series fostered my own abilities and desire to emulate my author heroes.

More than that, reading is the best training to hone our craft. Increasing vocabulary, finding new ways to build a scene in the mind of a reader through descriptions, and even deciphering the tone of a story can all shape our own style and help us to find ourselves within the scope of our own writing. Classes and practicing actual writing are of course just as necessary, but without taking the time to stop and enjoy the instruments that lead us to aspiring to become authors ourselves, it would all be for naught.

You Love Your Own Story

I know. It sounds a little narcissistic or even silly, but hear me out. If you don’t enjoy your work, why would anyone else? As I said before, Shifter began merely as a string of daydreams I had while on the bus or train commuting to work. I loved losing myself in the world I was creating inside my head and seeing the different characters live out their lives taking on challenges to overcome them heroically. Shouldn’t it be the same for any book that is headed for the #1 spot?

Again referencing my favorite series (I’m guessing it’s pretty obvious.), Harry Potter not only became a household name due to it’s immense universe, but remains such today due to the never-ending possibilities that exist within. The movie industry is still cashing in on the title for exactly that reason. They can find obscure characters and tell their stories so viewers can see how important they were behind the scenes all along. And that is only part of the puzzle.

Forget media rights and future works. What draws you into a story and keeps you coming back for more? Really take the time to answer that before reading on……Ready? It is losing yourself in pondering what goes on after the main story. What happens next? What went on during this event? I wonder what so-and-so was like before. I wonder if this character and that character were ever romantically involved. I wonder…I wonder…I wonder…That wonder is what makes a tale wonderful and continues to not only bring us as fans back for more but also drives us to talk so passionately about them to bring in new readers.

You Want to Work

Making money as an author isn’t hard. I’ve managed to make some money selling my ebook to a few friends and even a random clicker-through. Earning a living as an author, however, will put all your patience and researching to the test. All I’ve learned in the year and a half that I’ve been going through site after site and book after book reading up on how to best get my book out to the world and then promote it so the world sees it has taught me one thing: nothing comes easy.

And it truly excites me! I’m well aware that nothing worth doing is all easy all the time. What matters is that I am not only willing to take on that challenge but that the prospect is one that I look forward to every day. As an avid consumer of the internet, the idea that I get to get on every day to write something for a blog or try to make new connections with awesome people is a task that does not seem like work to me. Sure building up that animal called an email list is an uphill battle, and sure it takes a good deal of time networking and making sure I’m reading up where to throw my hat in to the reader-blogger pool can be a lot to handle. But at the end of the day, it is a war I am fighting because I believe I can win.

This is where the “want” part comes in. Many sites that I myself have read will let you know that you will need to work, but I’m willing to bet that you already know that. After all, you are either writing, considering writing, or have already written your masterpiece. That was most definitely work, which shows your work ethic. I believe it goes beyond that. A certain level of desire has to be present to make this commitment every day. And what I would like for you to take away more than anything else is that we can all enjoy it together. Which brings me to my last point.

You Love People

This one is purely me, but I am a firm believer that it is, or should be, the guiding principal in any profession. You will need to network, as I’m sure you are aware. That isn’t what I am referring to, though. No, what I mean is that you want to make a connection to your readers. After all, writing is all about giving them a window into your mind and soul and allowing them to take on your story in their own imaginations to make it their own. As they read you get to share an intimate bond with each one where you create a world or worlds together.

Just as paramount is the idea that we authors are not competing. If I become the next big author success story and everyone wants to read my series, does that mean they won’t read yours. Certainly not! I would be honored if anyone who has read Harry Potter reads Shifter and enjoys it because I know they have the same taste in literature as myself. The greatest thing about our line of work is that we do not need to fight one another for “customers.” Instead, we share our friends with one another to cultivate the world through the written word.

 

So, What Now?

Now go on to finish your book and let me know once it is done. At least for now I know I’ve got plenty of time to offer book reviews to help you on your way as well as to share ideas and build a new friendship. I’d love to hear about everyone’s progress regardless of where you are on your own road to fame.

Though this list is by no means exhaustive, and of course is only the key qualities I would like to believe that I have that have driven me thus far, it hopefully is encouraging to see in yourself so that you know you are on the right track. I will continue writing about the things in my daily life as I work through trying to become a real author. So keep aspiring to your own title of “aspiring author.”